23 Jul 2018

96-layer BiCS FLASH development with QLC technology revealed

Toshiba Memory Europe has announced that it has developed a prototype sample of a 96-layer BiCS FLASH, memory device using its proprietary 3D flash quad level cell (QLC) technology that boosts single-chip memory capacity to the highest level yet achieved.

QLC technology is pushing the bit count for data per memory cell from three to four, significantly expanding capacity. The new product achieves the industry's maximum capacity of 1.33 terabits for a single chip and was jointly developed with Western Digital Corporation.

This also realises capacity of 2.66 terabytes in a single package by utilising a 16-chip stacked architecture. The huge volumes of data generated by mobile terminals and the like continue to increase with the spread of SNS and the progress in IoT and the demand for analysing and utilising that data in real time is expected to increase dramatically. This will require even faster HDDs and larger capacity storage and such QLC-based products, using the 96-layer process, will contribute to the solution.

Toshiba Memory will start to deliver samples to SSD and SSD controller manufacturers for evaluation from the beginning of September and expects to start mass production in 2019.

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