25 Jun 2018

32-bit MCUs feature chip-level security and Arm TrustZone technology

Microchip announces the new SAM L10 and SAM L11 families of 32-bit microcontrollers (MCUs) which address the growing need for security in Internet of Things (IoT) endpoints by protecting against the increasing the risk of exposing intellectual property (IP) and sensitive information.

The new MCU families are based on the Arm Cortex-M23 core, with the SAM L11 featuring Arm TrustZone for Armv8-M, a programmable environment that provides hardware isolation between certified libraries, IP and application code. Microchip enables robust security by including chip-level tamper resistance, secure boot and secure key storage which, when combined with TrustZone technology, protects customer applications from both remote and physical attacks.

Both MCU families offer the lowest power consumption, as well as capacitive touch capability with excellent water tolerance and noise immunity. When benchmarked for power consumption, the SAM L10 received a ULPMark score of 405, which is over 200 percent better performance than the nearest competitor certified by the Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium (EEMBC). Microchip uses proprietary picoPower technology to provide low power consumption in active and all sleep modes.

In addition to TrustZone technology, the SAM L11 security features include an on-board cryptographic module supporting Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Galois Counter Mode (GCM) and Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA). The secure boot and secure key storage with tamper detection capabilities establish a hardware root of trust. It also offers secure bootloader for secure firmware upgrades.

Microchip has partnered with Trustonic, a member of Microchip’s Security Design Partner Programme, to offer a comprehensive security solution framework that simplifies implementation of security and enables customers to introduce end products faster. Microchip has also partnered with Secure Thingz and Data I/O Corporation to offer secure provisioning services for SAM L11 customers that have a proven security framework.

Both MCU families offer Microchip’s latest-generation Peripheral Touch Controller (PTC) for capacitive touch capabilities. Designers can easily add touch interfaces that provide an impressively smooth and efficient user experience in the presence of moisture and noise while maintaining low power consumption. The touch interface makes the devices ideal for a myriad of automotive, appliance, medical and consumer Human Machine Interface (HMI) applications.

The SAM L10 (DM320204) and SAM L11 (DM320205) Xplained Pro Evaluation Kits are available to kick-start development. All SAM L10/L11 MCUs are supported by the Atmel Studio 7 Integrated Development Environment (IDE), IAR Embedded Workbench, Arm Keil MDK as well as Atmel START, a free online tool to configure peripherals and software for accelerated development. START also supports TrustZone technology for configuring and deploying secure applications. A power debugger and data analyser tool is available to monitor and analyse power consumption in real-time and fine-tune the consumption numbers on-the-fly to meet application needs. Microchip’s QTouch Modular Library, 2D Touch Surface Library and QTouch Configurator are also available to simplify touch development.

The SAM L10 and SAM L11 devices are available now in a variety of pin counts and package options in volume production quantities.

Most popular news in Processing & embedded

Collaboration provides customers with embedded emWin GUI software
Reduce driver distraction with 3D gesture recognition controller
SoC interconnect solution delivers on efficiency for next-gen AI SoCs
Arduino & MathWorks team up to offer students engineering kit
AI-powered design and integration platform accelerates SoC designs

All news in this channel | All news


Share this page


Want more like this? Register for our newsletter






The benefits of replacing plain old paper with e-paper displays in automotive assembly plants HD Lee | Pervasive Displays
The benefits of replacing plain old paper with e-paper displays in automotive assembly plants
Efficiency is at the heart of automation, and that is nowhere more apparent than in the manufacture of automobiles. The Ford Motor Company is widely credited with inventing the moving assembly line, but the concept of moving the assembly, rather than the worker, dates back centuries.









Radio-Electronics.com is operated and owned by Adrio Communications Ltd and edited by Ian Poole. All information is © Adrio Communications Ltd and may not be copied except for individual personal use. This includes copying material in whatever form into website pages. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information on Radio-Electronics.com, no liability is accepted for any consequences of using it. This site uses cookies. By using this site, these terms including the use of cookies are accepted. More explanation can be found in our Privacy Policy