10 Jul 2018

Digi-Key announces 1.0 release of the KiCad library

Digi-Key Electronics, a global electronic components distributor, announces they have tagged the open source, Digi-Key KiCad symbol and footprint library with a 1.0 status on their GitHub Repository.

The “version 1.0” is a major milestone for the library development, indicating that the library is "complete", has all major features, and is considered reliable enough for general release to engineers, designers, and customers.

Digi-Key collaborated with the KiCad user community to refine library management processes, the data included with the parts, and worked extensively to improve the quality of the symbols and footprints. Each part is infused with Digi-Key descriptions, part numbers, and more data that allows for easy Bill of Materials resolution and uploading to the Digi-Key cart or BOM tool.

“After more than 140 GitHub commits and reviews of each part in the library, we are ready to announce the 1.0 release,” said Randall Restle, VP, Applications Engineering. “This is not the end of development and we are working hard to add more parts to the library and provide KiCad users with a useful set of symbols and footprints for their rapid prototyping needs. We are especially concentrating on difficult to make connectors and IoT modules.”

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