09 Aug 2018

App turns phone camera into a real-time 104-language translator

ABBYY, a global provider of content intelligence solutions and services, has announced a major update to TextGrabber for Android. The application now translates text in real time online and offline and is free to download with a premium subscription for a number of features.

The updated TextGrabber instantly captures text in 61 languages and translates it in real time to 104 languages online and 10 languages offline. The app allows users to translate text of any color on any background directly on the camera preview screen eliminating the need to take a photo, crop it or highlight the text. In contrast to other translation apps, it does not require users to download languages in order to translate offline.

TextGrabber automatically identifies if the device has access to a stable Internet connection, and if so, uses it to deliver full-text translation into 104 languages in real time. If the device does not have Internet access, the app switches to offline translation, which is essential for travel and everyday situations like understanding menus, street signs, labels, and more. Offline translation works for 10 common languages including English, Spanish, French, German, Chinese, and Japanese. The user also has the option to switch to the offline mode manually in the settings.

From now on, TextGrabber for Android is free to download. Upon installation, each user can leverage the full functionality of the app to capture, translate, and share three texts. After the three complimentary full-feature uses are over, they can still digitize texts and save them as notes in the app’s internal storage – this functionality is free. If the user would like to access the full functionality again, they are offered to purchase a subscription for a small monthly fee.

“The new, more affordable TextGrabber for Android is a perfect companion for travel and language learning. The most multifunctional OCR app on the market, it works for any everyday situation involving text. Whether it is printed text, a screenshot, street sign or a restaurant menu; whether you need to translate it and send it to a friend, or capture it and hear it read out loud – all of this can easily be done with TextGrabber,” comments Bruce Orcutt, Vice-President, Head of Product Marketing at ABBYY.

As always, TextGrabber captures text on photo or in real time and connects it to action. The app helps to digitize books, magazines, manuals, screens, menus, posters, and street signs. The captured text can be copied, edited, shared, translated or voiced. All links, phone numbers, email addresses, and street addresses become clickable for the user to easily perform the corresponding task: follow, call, email or find on maps. Text recognition is performed on the device. The technology works with 61 languages, the biggest number on the market in its category. All the digitized texts are saved in the app, easily accessible for further use.

TextGrabber also serves the needs of people with disabilities who can use it to capture and voice virtually any text from print, screens, street signs, and billboards. It improves accessibility of information, which is one of ABBYY’s core values and priorities.

The app complements ABBYY’s comprehensive portfolio of tools that simplify capture, digitization, and extraction of data. The company’s offering ranges from top-of-the-line mobile-based optical character recognition (OCR) to enterprise-level automated document processing enabled by machine learning and semantics.

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