25 Sep 2018

Maxim Unveils Wrist-Worn Platform for Health Monitoring

Healthcare wearables are a major element of the electronics market. With healthcare spend now exceeding 10% or annual GDP, it is a very important. Obviously methods to reduce the need for healthcare would make some significant improvements, not only in terms of quality of life, but also in terms of cost.

Healthcare wearables are seen as a major way or monitoring people and monitoring their health. This would help enable preventative medicine to be implemented rather than reactive, responding to ailments. But also healthcare helping treat patients will be of significant benefit. Accordingly the number of healthcare wearables is set to increase significantly.

Design can be a major issue as some healthcare wearables can take significant times to deliver. PLatforms capable of helping with the development of healthcare products can make major improvements in cost and time to market. IN fact, designers can now quickly create unique, highly accurate wearable solutions using Health Sensor Platform 2.0 (HSP 2.0) from Maxim.

This next-generation rapid prototyping, evaluation and development platform, also known as MAXREFDES101#, brings the ability to monitor electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate and body temperature to a wrist-worn wearable, saving up to six months in development time.

When it comes to wearables, a wrist-based device is convenient for users to wear daily. However, it has been challenging to derive precise ECG monitoring from the wrist (most alternatives require a wearable chest strap).

In addition, getting accurate body temperature typically requires using a thermometer at another location. Through its proprietary sensor and health monitoring technology, Maxim has overcome these challenges in the HSP 2.0.

Enclosed in a watch casing, the wrist-based form factor enables HSP 2.0 to provide basic functionality out of the box, with body-monitoring measurements starting immediately.

Data can be stored on the platform for patient evaluation or streamed to a PC for analysis later. Unlike other wearables, the data measurements collected by the HSP 2.0 can be owned by the wearer, alleviating PR 24/2018 EN September 2018 data privacy concerns and allowing users to conduct their own data analysis.

Also, because HSP 2.0 is an open platform, designers can evaluate their own algorithms on the board. In addition, the modular format is future proof to quickly accommodate new sensors over time.

HSP 2.0 portfolio includes the following products

  • MAX32630 DARWIN low-power microcontroller for wearables and internet of things (IoT) applications

  • MAX32664 ultra-low-power biometric sensor hub with embedded heart-rate algorithm

  • MAX20303 highly integrated and programmable power management solution designed for ultra-low-power wearable applications

  • MAX30205 human body temperature sensor with ±0.1 degree Celsius accuracy

  • MAX30001 ultra-low-power, single-channel integrated biopotential and bioimpedance analog front-end (AFE) solution for wearable applications

  • MAX86141 ultra-low-power optical pulse oximeter and heart-rate sensor for wearables

These products along with the platform can be used to create a host of different wearable products which will help to meet the need for developers designing these products.

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Gladys West - Pioneer of GPS Sven Etzold | U-blox
Gladys West - Pioneer of GPS
GPS and GNSS positioning technology is such an integral part of our lives today that we rarely stop to think about where it all came from. When we do, we usually picture men in white shirts and dark glasses hunched over calculators and slide rules. In fact, one of the early pioneers behind GPS and GNSS technology was Gladys West - a black woman.









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