10 Jan 2013

Back-up navigation guides ships in Dover Straits

The UK's Dover Strait - considered to be the world’s busiest shipping route - is the first to deploy eLoran radio navigation technology to counter jammers and space weather.

The General Lighthouse Authorities of the UK and Ireland (GLA) has turned on a radio station which broadcasts fine-tuned eLoran signals so ships fitted with eLoran receivers in the Port of Dover, its approaches and part of the Dover Strait can now use the technology as a backup to satnav systems.

The technology is based around longwave radio signals that already broadcast from nine separate stations in Northwest England, France, Germany, and the Faroe Islands.

The latest announcement from GLA represents the first of up to seven eLoran installations to be implemented along the East Coast of the United Kingdom.

The Thames Estuary and approaches up to Tilbury, the Humber Estuary and approaches, and the ports of Middlesbrough, Grangemouth and Aberdeen will all benefit from new installations, and the prototype service at Harwich and Felixstowe will be upgraded.

“Our primary concern at the GLA is for the safety of mariners,” says Ian McNaught, Chief Executive of Shipping Authority, Trinity House. “But signals from eLoran transmitters could also provide essential backup to telecommunications, smart grid and high frequency trading systems vulnerable to jamming by natural or deliberate means.”

Most popular news in RF topics

28GHz SDR targets 3GPP & Verizon 5G
Analog Devices & X-Microwave collaborate to simplify RF design
Widest bandwidth & lowest phase noise for high-speed systems
Ultra-wideband mixer with integrated LO buffer unveiled
Broadband amplifiers with tunable transmission characteristics

All news in this channel | All news


Share this page


Want more like this? Register for our newsletter








A flexible approach to better antennas Nick Robins | Alpha Micro Components
A flexible approach to better antennas
For the Internet of Things to become as ubiquitous as forecasts suggests, a lot of Things are going to need Internet connections, many of them wireless.
Whitepapers
mmWave The Battle of the Bands
5G mobile communications will use mmWave for many short range wide band links - but which microwave band will be used? Find out more in this informative white paper.

More whitepapers










Radio-Electronics.com is operated and owned by Adrio Communications Ltd and edited by Ian Poole. All information is © Adrio Communications Ltd and may not be copied except for individual personal use. This includes copying material in whatever form into website pages. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information on Radio-Electronics.com, no liability is accepted for any consequences of using it. This site uses cookies. By using this site, these terms including the use of cookies are accepted. More explanation can be found in our Privacy Policy