20 Sep 2017

Increase software power-measurement accuracy

Microchip has announced the immediate availability of a precision power- and energy-monitoring chip. The PAC1934 works in conjunction with a Microchip software driver that is fully compatible with the Energy Estimation Engine (E3) built into the Windows 10 operating system to provide 99 percent accuracy on all battery-powered Windows 10 devices.

Combining Microchip’s PAC1934 and Windows 10 driver with Microsoft’s E3 service can improve the measurement of battery usage from different software applications by up to 29 percent.

The PAC1934 is designed to measure voltage rails as low as 0V and as high as 32V. It is this ability that allows the chip to accurately measure power usage from simple Core Processing Unit (CPU) tasks all the way up to software running on devices that connect through a USB Type-C connector. The PAC1934 is a four-channel device with 16-bit power measurement and a 17-minute plus accumulation register, making it ideal for determining power consumption and energy usage without the need for voltage or current range adjustments.

The device has capabilities that could also make it an integral part in future software upgrades. Through bidirectional measurement, with the ability to measure both battery charging and battery discharge, the PAC1934 is well suited for upcoming USB Type-C charging topologies as they are developed and become more widely used. In addition, the device functions as a standard high-side current sensor for use in server, networking, automotive and industrial applications. Microchip is also actively working to support the PAC1934 in Linux for various applications.

The PAC1934 power-monitoring IC is available now for sampling and in volume production.

Most popular news in Processing & embedded

Pentair's configurable solutions reduce development costs & time
Better data security for vehicle communication with AURIX
Secure fingerprint USB for when precautions are a must
Japan exported a total of nearly 115,000 industrial robots
OLED Microdisplay offers super-small solution for VR / AR wearables

All news in this channel | All news


Share this page


Want more like this? Register for our newsletter






Fans in Digital Signage Players Are a Lose/Lose Proposition Jeff Hastings | BrightSign LLC
Fans in Digital Signage Players Are a Lose/Lose Proposition
Jeff Hastings of BrightSign has some interesting ideas on why fans should not be used in digital signage, and how to avoid using them.









Radio-Electronics.com is operated and owned by Adrio Communications Ltd and edited by Ian Poole. All information is © Adrio Communications Ltd and may not be copied except for individual personal use. This includes copying material in whatever form into website pages. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information on Radio-Electronics.com, no liability is accepted for any consequences of using it. This site uses cookies. By using this site, these terms including the use of cookies are accepted. More explanation can be found in our Privacy Policy