11 Dec 2017

Protected optical contacts prevent dirt contamination

HARTING’s new PushPull SFP XS fibre-optic connector is designed to address the biggest challenge to the use of optical connectors in industry: their susceptibility to dirt and damage to the contact surfaces forming the interface with the transceiver which converts the optical signal into an electrical signal.

Contamination in this area can result in poor or useless signals, but the HARTING PushPull SFP XS connectors do not suffer from this problem. They can be easily and quickly connected to a transceiver pre-assembled on site without having to open the optical link. The optical contacts are protected, even in dirty operating environments, to guarantee a clean signal.

Another key feature of the PushPull SFP XS connector is its sophisticated locking mechanism. Despite the compact design, the connector is compatible with various transceiver lengths. It also gives clear tactile and acoustic feedback to the user to indicate a secure connection. As a result, it provides a safe and trouble-free transmission solution for fibre-optic communication in harsh environments.

The HARTING PushPull SFP XS is ideally suited to use in industrial fibre-optic systems involving data transmission rates of more than 10 Gbit/s or distances of well over 100 metres. Typical applications include telecommunications or camera-based surveillance over large areas in the process industry.

Most popular news in Electronics components

AVX extends its space-qualified ESCC QPL 3009 Series
Balloon-borne infrasound sensor array detects explosions
Schaffner EMC single phase filters now with DC approval
HR Series resistors deliver robust performance in small outline
High pulse withstanding resistors offer excellent surge performance

All news in this channel | All news


Share this page


Want more like this? Register for our newsletter






The future of the Internet of Things: a world of sensors and controllers Rudy Ramos | Mouser Electronics
The future of the Internet of Things: a world of sensors and controllers
The Internet of Things, IoT is coming to fruition even now, but what will it look like when it fully appears and what components will be needed for all the different nodes, sensors and actuators being developed.









Radio-Electronics.com is operated and owned by Adrio Communications Ltd and edited by Ian Poole. All information is © Adrio Communications Ltd and may not be copied except for individual personal use. This includes copying material in whatever form into website pages. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information on Radio-Electronics.com, no liability is accepted for any consequences of using it. This site uses cookies. By using this site, these terms including the use of cookies are accepted. More explanation can be found in our Privacy Policy