LTE Frequency Band Notes

- additional notes and information about the LTE frequency bands.

There are many different bands that are being allocated for use with LTE. These bands are defined on the previous page.

On this page, additional notes and information are given about these different LTE bands.


LTE bands overview

The number of bands allocated for use has increased as the pressure increases on spectrum.

It has not been possible for all LTE band allocations to be the same across the globe because of the different regulatory positions in different countries. It has not been possible to gain global allocations.

In some cases bands appear to overlap. This is because of the different levels of availability around the globe.

This means that roaming with LTE may have some limitations as not all handsets or UEs will be able to access the same frequencies.


Notes accompanying LTE band tabulations

There are a few notes that can give some background to the LTE bands defined in the table on the previous page.

  • LTE Band 1:   This is one of the paired bands that was defined for the 3G UTRA and 3GPP rel 99.
  • LTE Band 4:   This LTE band was introduced as a new band for the Americas at the World (Administrative) Radio Conference, WRC-2000. This international conference is where international spectrum allocations are agreed. The downlink of band 4 overlaps with the downlink for Band 1. This facilitates roaming.
  • LTE Band 9:   This band overlaps with Band 3 but has different band limits and it is also only intended for use in Japan. This enables roaming to be achieved more easily, and many terminals are defined such that that are dual band 3 + 9
  • LTE Band 10:   This band is an extension to Band 4 and may not be available everywhere. It provides an increase from 45 MHz bandwidth (paired) to 60 MHz paired.
  • LTE Band 11:   This "1500 MHz" band is identified by 3GPP as a Japanese band, but it is allocated globally to the mobile service on a "co-primary basis".
  • LTE Band 12:   This band was previously used for broadcasting and has been released as a result of the "Digital Dividend."
  • LTE Band 13:   This band was previously used for broadcasting and has been released as a result of the "Digital Dividend." The duplex configuration is reversed from the standard, having the uplink higher in frequency than the downlink.
  • LTE Band 14:   This band was previously used for broadcasting and has been released as a result of the "Digital Dividend." The duplex configuration is reversed from the standard, having the uplink higher in frequency than the downlink.
  • LTE Band 15:   This LTE band has been defined by ETSI for use in Europe, but this has not been adopted by 3GPP. This band combines two nominally TDD bands to provide one FDD band.
  • LTE Band 16:   This LTE band has been defined by ETSI for use in Europe, but this has not been adopted by 3GPP. This band combines two nominally TDD bands to provide one FDD band.
  • LTE Band 17:   This band was previously used for broadcasting and has been released as a result of the "Digital Dividend."
  • LTE Band 20:   The duplex configuration is reversed from the standard, having the uplink higher in frequency than the downlink.
  • LTE Band 21:   This "1500 MHz" band is identified by 3GPP as a Japanese band, but it is allocated globally to the mobile service on a "co-primary basis".
  • LTE Band 24:   The duplex configuration is reversed from the standard, having the uplink higher in frequency than the downlink.
  • LTE Band 33:   This was one of the bands defined for unpaired spectrum in Rel 99 of the 3GPP specifications.
  • LTE Band 34:   This was one of the bands defined for unpaired spectrum in Rel 99 of the 3GPP specifications.
  • LTE Band 38:   This band is in the centre band spacing between the uplink and downlink pairs of LTE band 7.

Although 3GPP can defined bands for use in LTE or any other mobile service, the actual allocations are made on an international basis by the ITU are World radio Conferences, and then the individual country administrations can allocate spectrum use in their own countries. 3GPP has no legal basis, and can only work with the various country administrations.

Frequency bands may be allocated on a primary and secondary basis. Primary users have the first access to a band, secondary users, in general, may use the band provided they do not cause interference to the primary users.

Return to LTE frequency band tabulations.

By Ian Poole


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